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Writing

Sinisnuthear

Campfire Attention Holder
Nov 11, 2019
63
91
28
Under purgatory
www.soundcloud.com
10
I don’t compose before recording typically because I think improvising smaller studio settings strikes a note on your style of music instrumentation.
I do compose before the recording session if it is usually a tighter list to go into the studio with.

For example: graphic design for music is usually the first thing before either composing or recording, and even samples. So I’ll go with those first before laying out any thing worth recording or bulks of notes and writings.

Got really familiar with guitar pro. Programming your own drums is the way to go if you are a solo artist. GarageBand has a decent drummer and you can even makes simple progressions.

So for style I’ll lay it out with either samples or graphics then pick which instrument is best for harboring a tone for either going all the way down the set list or maybe for a really tasty solo being planned to be spawned out for my heavier stuff.

Never like to have a project not being used for more than a month usually.

Post your writing tricks, tone setters, or even striking styles you’ve learned over the course of being in the fam.
I’ll post some examples later just trying to start the thread rn.
 

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Ed Seith

Supreme Galactic Overlord
Staff member
Legend+
  • Nov 11, 2019
    3,882
    15
    6,603
    53
    Marana, AZ USA
    soundcloud.com
    35
    For riff-style writing, I like to just get a beat going, whether it's with a drum machine program (I use EZDrummer) or even just a YouTube video of a drumbeat or something. Find a basic beat and pick your tempo, then just start trying things and playing over it. After a few minutes, a basic riff starts to take form, and over a few minutes more it can become a little more refined and nuanced.

    From there, sometimes just playing that same part over and over until you get "bored" of it and want to do something differently. I find that my subconscious often knows where it wants to go at that point, so I just "try something different" to see where my brain wanted to go next. From there, I can refine that part, as well, and there's the foundation of a song, for me. Where it goes from there can come from any number of different places.

    Writing on acoustic, I may start with a simple chord, and then play around with moving one note of the chord up or down a half or whole step to see what THAT sounds like, and just explore from there. Sometimes taking an open-chord shape and moving it up the fretboard, leaving the open strings open, can lead to interesting things, too.
     

    Sinisnuthear

    Campfire Attention Holder
    Nov 11, 2019
    63
    91
    28
    Under purgatory
    www.soundcloud.com
    10
    For riff-style writing, I like to just get a beat going, whether it's with a drum machine program (I use EZDrummer) or even just a YouTube video of a drumbeat or something. Find a basic beat and pick your tempo, then just start trying things and playing over it. After a few minutes, a basic riff starts to take form, and over a few minutes more it can become a little more refined and nuanced.

    From there, sometimes just playing that same part over and over until you get "bored" of it and want to do something differently. I find that my subconscious often knows where it wants to go at that point, so I just "try something different" to see where my brain wanted to go next. From there, I can refine that part, as well, and there's the foundation of a song, for me. Where it goes from there can come from any number of different places.

    Writing on acoustic, I may start with a simple chord, and then play around with moving one note of the chord up or down a half or whole step to see what THAT sounds like, and just explore from there. Sometimes taking an open-chord shape and moving it up the fretboard, leaving the open strings open, can lead to interesting things, too.
    Nice man sounds a little more on the professional side. Maybe even indie. It’s hard to find good samples and graphics to get a vibe to you know what I mean lol
     

    Mark Kingston

    New Student
    Sep 16, 2022
    3
    2
    I don’t compose before recording typically because I think improvising smaller studio settings strikes a note on your style of music instrumentation.
    I do compose before the recording session if it is usually a tighter list to go into the studio with.

    For example: graphic design for music is usually the first thing before either composing or recording, and even samples. So I’ll go with those first before laying out any thing worth recording or bulks of notes and writings.

    Got really familiar with guitar pro. Programming your own drums is the way to go if you are a solo artist. GarageBand has a decent drummer and you can even makes simple progressions.

    So for style I’ll lay it out with either samples or graphics then pick which instrument is best for harboring a tone for either going all the way down the set list or maybe for a really tasty solo being planned to be spawned out for my heavier stuff.

    Never like to have a project not being used for more than a month usually.

    Post your writing tricks, tone setters, or even striking styles you’ve learned over the course of being in the fam.
    I’ll post some examples later just trying to start the thread rn. I had a lot of questions when writing a recommendation letter. And I thought it would be better to ask for help with a recommendation letter for service. But maybe you are right, it is better to ask your teacher first.
    Thanks for sharing your experience.
     
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